Cubist Head (Portrait of Fernande) by Pablo Picasso at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

In this episode, we’ll be visiting Cubist Head (Portrait of Fernande) by Pablo Picasso at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Pablo Picasso Oil on canvas Cubist head (portrait of Fernande) was painted around 1909-10. The Museum tells us that; “The sitter of this painting was almost certainly Fernande Olivier, with whom Picasso began a relationship in 1904 and painted many times. Fernande (born Amélie Lang) had a turbulent childhood and she ran away from home as a teenager. She married but left her abusive husband before the age of nineteen, changing her name to Fernande Bellevallée and then to Olivier to avoid detection. Fernande modelled for artists in Montmartre and met Picasso at the famous artists’

Portrait of a Man in Red from the Royal Collection at Hampton Court Palace

In this episode, we’ll be visiting Portrait of a Man in Red from the Royal Collection at Hampton Court Palace in England. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Portrait of a Man in Red is a painting by an unknown painter in the style of Hans Holbein the Younger. It’s estimated to be dated around 1530 and 1550 and to depict Henry VIII of England. We do have the information submitted when this was acquired by the Royal Collection on the 20th August 1662; “object stated in reference as: Acquired by Charles II in 1660 from William Frizell at Breda (List I no 21) as Holbein of Henry VIII when young; recorded in the Queen’s Gallery at Hampton Court in 1666

The Flood By Claude Monet

In this episode, we’ll be taking a quick look at Claude Monet’s The Flood. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King.

Who’s Afraid of the New Technology By Alan Robb at The McManus Art Gallery & Museum in Dundee, Scotland

In this episode, we’ll be visiting Who’s Afraid of the New Technology By Alan Robb at The McManus Art Gallery & Museum in Dundee, Scotland. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Who’s Afraid of the New Technology, 1987 is an acrylic on canvas by Alan Robb who was born in Glasgow in 1946. The museum tell us; “In this major work, Robb explores the creation of pictorial space. He opens the composition out like a stage set, and includes recognisable motifs culled from windsurfing magazines and Mediterranean holiday brochures. Much of his work was inspired by cut paper collage. This work moves into the digital age inspired by Quantel Paintbox, which revolutionised 1980s advertising and post- production in video and film.

Aquamanile in the Shape of a Lion at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge

In this episode, we’ll be visiting Aquamanile in the Shape of a Lion at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. This aquamanile is from the middle ages. In Latin water is aqua and hand is manus. This kind of ewer was meant to wash your hands hands but also to create a bit of fun. The museum tells us: “Probably made in Lower Saxony in the Hildesheim area, c.1250-1350; the left hind leg and tail are of later date. Brass. Zoomorphic aquamaniles (vessels for pouring water) were made in pottery and metalwork. Lions may have been used for liturgical or a domestic purpose. This example later belonged to the painter, Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828-82) Given by

The Story of Abraham Tapestries at the Great Hall at Hampton Court Palace in England

In this episode, we’ll be visiting The Story of Abraham Tapestries at the Great Hall at Hampton Court Palace in England. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Filling the walls of the Great Hall are a series of tapestries depicting scenes from the life of the patriarch Abraham, as recounted in the Book of Genesis. It is likely that these tapestries were commissioned by Henry VIII and were first displayed in the Great Hall in 1546. Crafted in Brussels from a combination of wool, silk, and threads of gold and silver, these tapestries were assessed at a remarkable £8,260 during the valuation of the Royal Collection following the execution of Charles I in 1649. This valuation established them as the most

Rick Kirby Sculpture at the Great Fosters

In this episode, we’ll be visiting the metal Rick Kirby Sculpture at the Great Fosters 16th-century mansion. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Rick Kirby who was born 1952 is an artist from England, originally from Gillingham, Kent. He used to teach art for a long time but then decided to focus only on his own art. He likes making sculptures that look like people, especially their faces and bodies. Most of his sculptures are made from steel because it lets him make really big artworks that have a lot of impact. Kirby once said, “Steel changed everything for me. It allowed me to make huge sculptures, which I couldn’t do with stone… it is the juxtaposition of steel in its

Pleasure Boats, Argenteuil by Claude Monet

In this episode, we’ll be taking a quick look at Claude Monet’s Pleasure Boats, Argenteuil. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. By Anthony King (c)

English garden art at Great Fosters, a 16th-century mansion in Surrey

In this episode, we’ll be visiting a piece of English garden art at Great Fosters, a 16th-century mansion in Surrey. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Great Fosters, a 16th-century mansion, once stood within Windsor Great Park near Egham, Surrey, England. Legend has it that King George III found respite there in his final days, as the mansion served as a care facility from 1818 onward. But its royal ties don’t stop there. The entrance proudly displays Queen Elizabeth I’s crest from 1598, possibly commemorating her visit. During summers, the queen and her court embarked on countryside tours, dubbed ‘progresses’, fleeing London’s diseases and heat. By Anthony King (c)