Claude Monet’s The Sea Port in Amsterdam

Today we’ll be looking at Claude Monet’s The Sea Port in Amsterdam. Welcome to Art, Culture & Travel with me, Anthony King. Claude Monet was born in Paris on the 14th November 1840 and was the founder of Impressionism. Even the word itself; “Impressionism” was taken from his painting Soleil Levant which he exhibited in 1874. Incredibly, Monet actually suffered from partial blindness from around 1914 as he had cataracts which he was apparently afraid to have removed. By Anthony King

Female Nude by Philip Andreevich Malyavin at the National Gallery Of Slovenia

I travelled to see Female nude by Philip Andreevich Malyavin at the National Gallery Of Slovenia. Come join me there too. Welcome to Art, Culture & Travel with me, Anthony King. Filipp Andreevich Malyavin was born on October 22nd 1869 in Orenburg Oblast, Russia. He was trained in icon painting and studied under a Russian realist master called Ilya Repin. Unusually, he came from a lowly peasant background which was very unique for Russian artists at the time. He exhibited his work in London, Stockholm, and Nice in 1935 and 1937 after touring and showcasing his work previously in Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, England, and Sweden in 1933. He painted another painting; the very famous “Whirlwind” which we’ll visit in a later video but today we’re looking

Mandora 1909 By Georges Braque at the Tate Modern London

I travelled to see Mandora 1909 By Georges Braque at the Tate Modern London. Come join me there too. Welcome to Art, Culture & Travel with me, Anthony King. Georges Braque (1882-1963) was born and worked in France and is of course, one of the world’s most famous artists. He painted this instrument and the gallery tell us: “Braque collected musical instruments. His interest is reflected in this painting of a small lute called a mandora. Its fragmented style suggests a sense of rhythm and acoustic reverberation that matches the musical subject. Braque explained that he liked to include instruments in his cubist works: ‘in the first place because I was surrounded by them, and secondly because their plasticity, their volumes, related to my particular

The Building of Westminster Bridge, 1749 By Samuel Scott at Science Museum London

In this episode, we’ll be visiting The Building of Westminster Bridge, 1749 By Samuel Scott at Science Museum London. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Samuel Scott was born in 1702 and was a British landscape painter best known for his riverside scenes. This painting was lent by the Governor and Company of The Bank of England to the Science museum, who tell us: “This painting celebrates the construction of Westminster Bridge, which was completed in 1750. It depicts the innovative machine employed to speed up the process. Previously, London Bridge had been the city’s only river crossing. Despite some opposition to its construction, particularly from London’s watermen, Westminster Bridge led to new developments and improved roads, particularly south of the

Portrait of King George III when Prince of Wales by Allan Ramsay

In this episode, we’ll be visiting Portrait of King George III when Prince of Wales by Allan Ramsay at the Science Museum London. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. This Portrait of the King was lent by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England to the Science Museum London. They tell us: “King George III is depicted here as Prince of Wales, a year or two before his coronation. He enjoyed a lifelong passion for natural philosophy, agriculture and astronomy. George’s reign is sometimes seen as being overshadowed by industrialisation, imperial failures and the debilitating illness that affected him in old age. However, this overlooks the influence he exerted on science and the arts in Britain, thanks to his

Bottle of Rum and Newspaper By Juan Gris at the Tate Modern London

In this episode, we’ll be visiting Bottle of Rum and Newspaper By Juan Gris at the Tate Modern London. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Juan Gris was born in Spain in 1887 and was a Cubist. I really like this Oil on Canvas. The gallery tell us: “Like many cubist works, Gris’s painting provides a revised experience of the everyday, whether in the studio or in a familiar café. Glimpsed letters confirm the positions of the two objects: UM for rum, JOUR (of ‘journal’) for the newspaper. A table is indicated by the false wood-graining, a house-painter’s skill much admired by the cubists because it is identifiably as an illusion. Gris interweaves these fragmentary images of the familiar into a

Linen 1913 by Natalia Goncharova at the Tate Modern in London

In this episode, we’ll be visiting Linen 1913 by Natalia Goncharova at the Tate Modern in London. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. The gallery tell us that Natalia Goncharova was born 1881 in the Russian Empire, and worked in the Russian Empire and France “The two sides of the work are divided between men’s and women’s items of laundry-shirts, collars and cuffs on the left; lace, undergarments and an apron on the right. Each side bares Cyrillic initials; the iron the artist’s own monogram, the folded shirt a mysterious ‘AL’. PRACHE is part of the Russian word for ‘laundry’, BOT possibly part of the word meaning ‘work’. B.S. could be an abbreviation for ‘whitewash’. The painting conveys a dynamic impression

Ile de France 1935 by Jean Hélion at the Tate Modern London

In this episode, we’ll be visiting Ile de France 1935 by Jean Hélion at the Tate Modern London. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Jean Hélion, born on April 21, 1904 was a prominent French painter whose abstract creations during the 1930s positioned him as a significant figure in the realm of modernist art. With regards to this Oil paint on canvas the museum tell us: “Hélion was one of the most prominent abstract artists in Paris in the 1930s. He later returned to a more representational style. Ile de France is mostly composed of flattened planes of colour but the forms in the foreground appear solid and three- dimensional. At the time, Hélion reflected: ‘The more I advance the more

The Soviets in Space Poster 1963 at the Science Museum London

In this episode, we’ll be visiting The Soviets in Space Poster 1963 at the Science Museum London. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Soviet space posters often show a hopeful view of a better life through scientific progress. They depict new lands, planets, and societies, inspired by a movement called Russian Cosmism. The museum tell us: “Long live the world’s first female cosmonaut’: a Soviet poster (in Czech) celebrating Valentina Tereshkova, who orbited the Earth in Vostok 6 in June 1963. As with Sputnik in 1957, and with Yuri Gagarin, who had undertaken the first manned space flight in Vostok 1 on 12 April 1961, the flight of Tereshkova was an event deliberately loaded with symbolic meaning. It was to be