The Triumph of Death by Pieter Bruegel the Younger at The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

Pieter Brueghel the Younger was born in Brussels in 1564 and was a Flemish painter He is known for his many copies of his father’s work; Pieter Bruegel the Elder. The son was traditionally well known as “Hellish Brueghel” because it was thought that he liked to paint pretty heavy and fiery devilish paintings! This particular painting was bequeathed by Richard Edward Kerrich in 1872. The museum tells us about The Triumph of Death painting: “The design for Pieter Brueghel the Younger’s harrowing picture originates in the work of his father, Pieter Bruegel the Elder (1525/30- 69). His Triumph of Death, (1562, Museo del Prado, Madrid) is one of his most inventive compositions. He created his own imposing vision of the late-medieval allegory of the

After the Wedding by Laurence Stephen Lowry at The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

In this episode, we’ll be visiting After the Wedding by Laurence Stephen Lowry at The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Laurence Stephen Lowry was born in Stretford 1 November 1887 and died 23 February 1976. He painted this oil on canvas in 1939. The museum tell us: “Lowry is known as a painter of busy street scenes and townscapes. He was born in Stretford (now part of Greater Manchester) and as a boy he saw it transformed by industrialization led by the building of the Manchester Ship Canal in 1894. Many of his paintings depict the newly urbanized areas of Stretford and Pendlebury, Salford, where he lived most of his life. Here the atmosphere of gloom is

Voe Of Papa Stour by James Kinnear at the Shetland Museum & Archives

In this episode, we’ll be visiting Voe Of Papa Stour by James Kinnear at the Shetland Museum & Archives. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Voe Of Papa Stour was painted by Edinburgh born artist James Kinnear in 1900. He was born in 1846 and specialised in coastal landscapes. Like me, you may have initially thought that “voe” translated as “view” in some kind of Shetland dialect but no, “Voe” is a term used in Shetland, Scotland, to refer to a narrow inlet or bay. “Papa Stour” is one of the Shetland Islands, known for its rugged coastline, sea cliffs, and archaeological sites. I had the privilege of travelling up to the Shetland Isles in one of those crazy adventures. I

Bright Eyes by John Everett Millais at the Aberdeen Art Gallery

In this episode, we’ll be visiting Bright Eyes by John Everett Millais at the Aberdeen Art Gallery in Scotland. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. John Everett Millais, one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was born in Southampton, England in 1829 and he painted the oil on canvas Bright Eyes in 1877. It was an Alexander Macdonald Bequest in 1901. The Aberdeen Art Gallery tell us: “Alexander Macdonald was a wealthy granite merchant and art collector from Aberdeen. He bought Bright Eyes the year it was painted. It hung in his dining room until it was donated to the Gallery after the death of his widow in 1901, along with the rest of his collection. He also established a

Roman Hercules Bust at the British Museum, London

In this episode, we’ll be visiting the Roman ‘Hercules’ Bust at the British Museum, London. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. We are looking at a Roman ‘Hercules’ Bust from the 2nd Century AD which is made of marble and is in the corner of the enlightenment room at the British Museum. The actually bust represents the Greek hero Herakles who was the Roman hero Hercules. This statue is a copy of a bronze original by the renown Greek sculptor Lysippos who was from the 4th century BC. Lysippos is considered one of best sculptors of all time, in fact he’s known as being one of the top three of classical Greek sculptor – although it’s a challenge to identify his

The God’s Wife of Amun & The God’s Wife | Ancient Egyptian Granite Statue

In this episode, we’ll be visiting ‘The Gods Wife’ at the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization in Cairo, Egypt. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. Originating from the ancient Egyptian third intermediate period (1069 – 747 BC), this granite statue represents ‘The Gods Wife.’ The role was a significant religious institution in ancient Egypt and was fulfilled by women from the reigning royal family. These women served as intermediaries or links between the god and the king. During this period, a very similar title and role existed: The God’s Wife of Amun. My understanding is that they were actually different roles though. This royal title was typically held by women connected to the king, either as wives or mothers. The God’s

The Ceremonial Throne of Tutankhamun

In this episode, we’ll be visiting the Ceremonial Throne of Tutankhamun. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. I previously took you to on a tour of the Gilded Wooden Golden Throne of Tutankhamun from the Egyptian 18th Dynasty (1336-1327 BC) which was one of the many treasures found in the Pharaoh’s burial chamber. That’s made of wood with golden gilding, silver, glass, and precious gemstones. You will notice that it’s a very different style and aesthetic to this ceremonial one. They’re displayed very close to each other at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. The Ceremonial Throne of Tutankhamun is, of course from the same Egyptian 18th Dynasty. Interestingly, six chairs were buried with Tutankhamun in his burial chamber and surrounding area.

The Colossal head of the god Serapis at The Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square, Cairo

In this episode, we’ll be visiting the Colossal head of the god Serapis at The Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square, Cairo. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King. This was created during the Roman period, around the 2nd century AD and is made of marble. It represents Serapis, a deity combining attributes of Osiris and Apis. The cult of Serapis became linked to themes of life after death and agricultural abundance, intertwining aspects of both Egyptian and Greek beliefs. The extensive popularity of Serapis can be attributed to the Greek Pharaoh Ptolemy I, who sought to unify the subjects of the Ptolemaic Kingdom, combining Greek and Egyptian influences. Under Ptolemy I’s orders, a cult statue of Serapis was erected in Alexandria. This

Woman Bathing by Edgar Degas

In this episode, we’ll be visiting Woman Bathing by Edgar Degas at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. Welcome to Art, Culture & Books with me, Anthony King.